the true representation of your message requires a combination of skill professionalism accessibility awareness of the language and good old-fashioned horse sense experience counts Translation requires a love of language, a love of communication, a love of connection   Extraordinary writing and editing skills that depend on knowledge not machine technology
    There's a lot to be said for buying local and for having a personal relationship to a client
Spanish is not a uniform language, there are dialectal variants throughout the Hispanosphere My 25-years of practical knowledge allows me to provide professional high-quality timely efficient accurate and value-added services as second nature.
As a inhabitant and product of the North American language border I have a firm understanding of what it is to be a living cog in the mechanism of US-Latino culture

How can I help you?

You've got a message to share with the world! Ordinarily that's a straightforward process: you hone your information into a concise and easily-grasped narrative, which you present to an audience that listens, learns, and becomes informed. You are understood. But what happens if there is an extra step in the proceedings? What happens if your message is filtered through the customs and syntax of an entirely different culture? Are you really being heard?

By way of a crude experiment, let's take the first few sentences of this page and run them through one of the free Spanish translator services available on the Internet, then use that same service to re-translate the text back into English:

How I can help him?

You have obtained a message to share with the world! Commonly that is a sincere process: you sharpened its information in a concise narrative and easily-got, that you present to an audience that listens, learns, and arrives at to be reported.

Your message has certainly been translated, but are you understood? Not by the evidence of this simple test.

Admittedly this example is a little contrived, but it goes some way to illustrating the pitfalls of poor, inexperienced, or automatic translators. From a translation standpoint, the true representation of your message requires a combination of skill, professionalism, accessibility, awareness of the language, and good old-fashioned horse sense! This is a skill-set that can only be cultivated through practice, participation and understanding. In other words: experience counts!

Translation requires a love of language; a love of communication; a love of connection. My job is to link people together, to create understanding and to foster clarity. I have the privileged position of listening to all sides of a conversation, and the responsibility of conveying meaning.

Any translator must embody her native language and deeply know her target tongue. But languages are not static—they are stream-like; dynamic, evolving and ever-changing. To be accurate and effective, a translator must flow with the living currents of her languages, and change as they change. She must be in a constant state of learning: participating in professional activities; entering into dialogue and collaboration with colleagues; and cognizant of current language, market, and media trends.

Any effective translator's checklist must include the following:

  • Extraordinary writing and editing skills that depend on knowledge, not machine technology. Yet the contemporary translator must be savvy when it comes to software innovations and translation tools. As we've seen above, automated processes can produce woeful results in-and-of themselves, but the technologically clued-in translator can streamline her workflow exponentially with the right equipment. This reads as a significant reduction of your gross expenditure and your blood pressure!

  • The ability to work well and openly within a team of editors, project managers, designers, and the client. I am equally at home working alone or within a team.

  • Accessibility to the client. There's a lot to be said for ‘buying local' and for having a personal relationship to a client. To know your client's needs and objectives is to speak their language both literally and metaphorically. Outsourcing your job halfway around the world may save a few cents in the short term, but that can be a false economy if you have to scrabble to find your translator in a different time zone to get minor changes done to complete your project. Which segues nicely into the next requirement…

  • Direct knowledge and understanding of the client's final audience. Spanish is not a uniform language; there are dialectal variants throughout the Hispanosphere. For example, the stylistic differences between Mexican Spanish with its Hispanicized Nahuatl influence, and the Rioplatense dialects of Argentina and Uruguay are numerous. Thus if your tight budget makes a half-a-world-away translator sound fiscally appealing, you should consider that their work may not be geographically suited to your end-user's dialect, and you—again—may have hidden costs fixing your message. This could mean the difference between having your work translated (see above) or being understood.

My 25-years of practical knowledge allows me to provide professional, high-quality, timely, efficient, accurate and value-added services as second nature. I am an American citizen and resident, with strong roots in Mexico, my country of birth. As a inhabitant and product of the North American language border, I have a firm understanding of what it is to be a living cog in the mechanism of US-Latino culture. I work with a broad client base, and am equally comfortable translating, interpreting or copy-editing either on my own or with a team.

Let my experience count for you: You've got a message worth sharing, and I speak your language! Let's tell the world!

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I work with a broad client base and am equally comfortable translating interpreting or copy-editing either on my own or with a team Let my experience count for you You've got a message worth sharing and I speak your language Let's tell the world!
 
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